Posted in Real Estate: Buy, Sell, Lease

How to Transition to a Business-Friendly Home

Guest Post by Marcus Lansky

Every business needs a base of operations and, if the kitchen table isn’t fit for purpose, it may be worth considering a move altogether. The professionals at Coleman Tanner Realty are determined to help you find a property suitable for both living and working. But, before you reach out, here are some important questions you should first ask yourself.

What Are Your Home Office Requirements?

When it comes to setting up a home office, there are a few key requirements – the most obvious of these is space. It can be a good idea to calculate how much square footage your business requires.

For entrepreneurs that are dealing with physical products, this may be more than someone who is entirely digitally based. Space is also a consideration when trying to partition your workplace from family areas – using floor plans, we can gauge your requirements and work out your specifications precisely.

On the other hand, if you’re working digitally you’ll have an increased reliance on high-speed internet access. The Federal Communication Commission (FCC) broadband deployment map can help you to check internet availability and compare locations. The FCC’s recent progress report found that 6% of Americans still do not have internet access so be sure to check any potential locations for dark spots.

Where and When To Move?

Location is doubly-important for someone looking to secure a home office – you may want to move into or close to a thriving business ecosystem. A study by the EPA found that central business districts tend to generate 20 more patents per worker and that’s not to mention reduced shipping costs, proximity to clients and other key benefits.

However, with the advent of remote working, these advantages can be offset by the higher costs, denser traffic or inconvenience to family life. You’ll want to weigh up your options and consider location in relation to your work.

If you’re looking to form an LLC (Limited Liability Company) in Florida then you should also pay close attention to state regulations. An LLC can help you save on paperwork, tax and reduce your personal liabilities, but the rules vary depending on location in the USA. Click here to learn more about the registration process.  

The other consideration is ‘when’ to buy. In a seller’s market, it may be smarter to wait or even to purchase in an area that you think may scale over the coming years. There are now a number of online tools to help you identify high-growth properties in areas nearby or you can contact your agent directly to request a free market analysis.

How Can I Save Money?

As important as the market itself is, understanding mortgage rates and buying strategies is also key.

For example, you can save money with a new property by purchasing ‘as is’. This means that the seller has made no repairs prior to listing and any problems, major or minor, become your responsibility.

In this case, you should look to work with a lawyer to inspect and examine the land records and the property itself for any potential red flags. A property ‘as is’ can represent a great investment but background checks are crucial to avoid regrets later.

Once you’ve asked yourself the above questions, you’ll have a clearer idea of what kind, whereabouts and how to go about finding the perfect work-from-home property. From there, you’re ready to hire a trustworthy Realtor®️ and begin your house hunt.

Connect with the experts at Coleman Tanner Realty and take the next step toward securing your dream Florida home.

Posted in Real Estate: Buy, Sell, Lease

Veteran Business Owner Speaks on Innovative Business Model for Real Estate Brokerage Startup in Florida.

“The Horse’s Mouth: Veterans Edition” with Michele Poitier and John Tanner

https://blog.thefirewatch.org/the-horses-mouth-veterans-edition-with-michele-poitier-and-john-tanner/

Posted in Real Estate: Buy, Sell, Lease

Can I Become a Homebuyer if I Have Bad Credit?

Image courtesy of Gabby K from Pexels

You may be a good candidate for a credit restoration program. Once you’ve improved your credit scores above the qualifying standards and have the eligibility income required, you can get an approval from the lender. If you need help with your down payment, there are sometimes local housing grants that are available on homes being sold in certain regions. You should consult with a credit repair specialist and a mortgage lender for an analysis of your current income and liabilities, as well as guidance on your next steps. Lenders can be found on Rocket Mortgage. Lexington Law specializes in credit repair. If you would like to speak to one of our preferred partners, we can arrange an introduction. Stay persistent in your pursuit of homeownership, your future self will thank you.

Posted in new construction, Uncategorized

What Roofing Materials Should I Buy?

Shingle, Clay Tile, or Metal?

1. Clay tile. AKA “Spanish tile” (my favorite) this material is considered the most attractive, but also more expensive. This roof will have a 50 to 100 year life expectancy, but is costly to repair.

Benefit: good wind resistance.

Metal Roof

2. Steel Panels. This roofing material is less expensive than clay tile, but not as attractive.

Benefit: lower cost & good wind resistance.

Composition Shingle

3. Composition Shingle. There are many grades of shingle quality to choose from, they are the most affordable material, and they have a 20 to 50 year life expectancy. However, they are the least wind resistant.

Benefit: low-cost.

Solar Panels = Lower Electric Bills

Roofing Options: Solar Panels. When you are thinking about your roofing installation, you may want to consider adding solar panels. They may cut your electric bill, but you should consider the installation costs, as well as future repair and replacement costs. Also, they may be difficult to remove when repairing your roof and they are not attractive.

Perhaps when the technology expands to the point where the panels are embedded into the roofing materials, it will become a “must have.” For now, you may need to crunch the numbers closely before placing an order.

In closing, when designing your new home, you may be restricted by the developer’s rules on what roofing material you can use. Also, take into consideration your environment and how well your preference will blend in. Lastly, remember the old adage that you get what you pay for.

Happy Homebuilding!

Posted in Real Estate: Buy, Sell, Lease

New Book Release:

Now Available on Amazon (or download here for FREE)
Posted in Uncategorized

New Construction: What Is Standard vs. Upgrades?

Model homes commonly showcase almost every upgrade offered by the builder.

New home buyers often fall in love with the model homes they visit because the builders hire interior designers to showcase almost every premiere feature they offer. As such, it is important to clarify what IS and what IS NOT included in the model that you buy.

Here is a list of typical upgrades offered by most new home builders:

  • Coffered, Vaulted, or Raised Ceilings,
  • Built-in Shelving, Alcoves, Art Niches, or TV Cut-outs,
  • Bonus Room, Mud Room, Laundry Room, In-Law Quarters, or Sun Rooms,
  • Covered Patio or Lanai, Wood Deck, Brick Paver or Concrete Slab Patio,
  • Swimming Pool (with Option to Screen Patio),
  • Landscaping (Front/Rear/Sides),
  • Fireplaces and Mantles,
  • Covered Porch,
  • 1 to 3 Car Garage and/or “Porto Cochere” (carport),
  • Dormers (real or faux), Shutters (real or faux), or Decorative Windows (such as “Bay” Windows),
  • Skylights or Recessed Lighting, and
  • Optional Siding (Brick, Stone, Stucco, or Log Siding). Note: I recommend you avoid buying a home with synthetic stucco, vinyl, aluminum, Hardy board (aka T-111 siding), or Masonite lap siding. These low cost options have aged poorly in the past and may cost you money for replacement when you want to sell, as well as lose its luster and reduce your home’s curb appeal.

Also, keep in mind what others are doing in your neighborhood. An appraisal rule of thumb to keep in mind is that if your home is the only one in the neighborhood that has a fancy “thing-a-ma-gig” that nobody else has, it will be deemed an “over improvement” and not be given weight to the bottom line market value of your home.

In closing, when negotiating the features of your new home, be sure to get the cost of each upgrade upfront and in writing and stick to your budget. Compare the builder’s costs versus doing it yourself, or consider the cost of outsourcing some of these optional items, such as the pool, on your own, post-purchase. But do keep in mind that any items included now will also be financed into your home loan at highly remarkable, low interest rates – in today’s market October, 2020 – that’s under 4% for a fixed 30-year loan.

Best of luck in your new home construction purchase!

Posted in Real Estate Sales Tips

To Build (New Construction) or Not to Build, That is the Question!

Buying “new construction” is an exciting undertaking. Unlike buying an existing home, you’ll get to make it your own before turning the key for the first time. Here are ten tips to keep in mind as you begin your home building journey.

  1. Establish a Set Budget. When it comes to establishing a budget for your new home, being a prudent homeowner is highly recommended. Therefore, you should plan on paying a 20% down payment on your new home and your monthly housing expense (principal, interest, tax, insurance, and association fee) at 25% of your income.
  2. Get Everything in Writing. Having a lawyer review your initial contract and any subsequent amendments is highly recommended. Here are a few items to look for in the contract: (i) a “cooling off” period; (ii) payment schedule; (iii) timeframe for completion; (iv) included plans and specifications, warranties and insurance protection; and no blank spaces. Be clear about what changes are allowed once you “sign off” on the final plans. Two addendums you should include are (a) “all changes must be clearly documented & mutually agreed upon” and “time is of the essence.”
  3. Stay Informed. Ask the builder for regular updates. Have somebody take pictures of the progress so you have evidence of any issues that may arise.
  4. Be Patient. Delays will happen. This is a marathon, not a sprint.
  5. Prepare for Hidden Costs. Does the developer’s estimate include “Finishing Costs”? How about zoning or CDD fees? Does your estimate include utility hookups, such a electric and gas meters? What about internet service wiring and installation? Are there estimates for your exterior, such as landscaping, concrete decks or brick pavers, fences and entries, or a mailbox? Try to think of every expense associated with your new home so that your estimate is as close to perfect as possible and that you have adequate financing in place to cover every expense. Ask about closing costs and developer contributions, if any.
  6. Choose the Right Builder. It’s always a good idea to read online reviews, talk to residents in the new community about their experience, and see if any complaints are filed against them on USA.gov – consumer complaints, the Federal Trade Commission, and the Better Business Bureau. Also check to see if they are registered with the National Association of Home Builders. Lastly, are they good at communication? The last thing you want is to feel in the dark whilst waiting on your new home to be built.
  7. Hire a Private Home Inspector (HI). Look for a home inspector with a current or prior Residential Contractor or General Contractor license. This type of person will know all the building materials and methods used in the construction industry. Their job is to ensure the structure is built up to code and complies with the municipal and HOA regulations and CC&Rs. Having the new home inspected by a 3rd party will help you rest easy at night while you wait. There are four stages of construction which warrant an updated inspection: (i) Foundations & Footings: the HI will check the slabs, foundations, drains and form work; (ii) Framing: the HI will check that the walls are straight & level, verify room dimensions, and ceiling height and roof lines all conforming to the plans & specs; (iii) Lock Up: This is the stage where the windows and doors have been installed. The HI will check the frames, seals, window flashing, brick and mortar work, and electric and plumbing; (iv) Final Inspection (Pre-Handover): At this point your home should be ready for a Certificate of Occupancy. Your HI will check for final interior/exterior finishings, paint, tile, carpet, wood flooring, cabinetry, windows & doors, and hardware, as well as inspect the site to ensure it is clear of any remaining materials or debris.
  8. Create an Image File. You will be looking at plenty of options for creating your new home just the way you want it, and trying to convey a mental image of the vision for what you want each room to look like is quite tricky. So, why not save images that demonstrate what you want? This will help you communicate your requests to the builder and other 3rd parties more succinctly.
  9. Think About the Little Things. Having electrical, telephone and internet outlets installed after drywall & insulation are installed is practically impossible to have done, so be sure to think about where you want your TVs mounted and cable boxes set prior to the electrical installation date. Do you plan on enjoying afternoon on the patio in the shade? The direction of your new home and where the sun sets will impact whether or not this happens. Keep shady sunsets in mind when you are looking at available lots. Location is important! By the way, corner lots are usually bigger and offer more privacy (one neighbor instead of two), so you’ll likely be charged a premium for it.
  10. Lastly, Begin With the End in Mind. Will this be your “forever” home or your “retirement retreat”? Whether you plan to grow a family in a home that you’ll spend the rest of your life in, or one you will approach your golden years in, take time to envision the lifestyle you want for yourself (and your growing family, perhaps) before you select a new home development.

In closing, buying a new home is fun when you think of the construction details with a business-like approach, and the community lifestyle & interior design with your heart. We wish you a successful journey in pursuit of your “forever” home!

Coleman Tanner Realty – Your Home for Real Estate Solutions!

To schedule a Home Buyer Consultation, we can be reached at (786) 258-8877 or by e-mail at sales@colemantanner.com.

http://www.colemantanner.com

Coleman Tanner Realty is an Equal Opportunity Housing provider.

Posted in Real Estate Investing

How To Calculate True ROI for a SFR Rental Investment

Are you thinking about getting into the real life game of Monopoly? If so, you probably have a few questions you want answered before committing yourself to your first investment purchase, such as:

  1. What is the property worth?
  2. How do you calculate return on investment? (ROI)?
  3. How much equity will I earn through appreciation?
  4. What are my tax burdens going to be?

The answers to these questions vary with every property as no two transactions are ever identical. That notwithstanding, let’s take a look at the basics and figure out how to analyze a property to determine whether or not it is a good deal for you.

ROI?

Q1. What is the Property Worth?

The answer to this question depends on whether the property is a single-family residence, a 2 to 4 unit property, or a 5+ unit multi-family property. Generally speaking, the market dictates the value of 1 to 4 unit residences using a valuation model called the sales comparison approach. The sales price/rent price of comparable properties that recently closed within the immediate area of the subject property are analyzed to determine an opinion of value.

For commercial real estate, 2 to 4 unit properties, or 5+ multi-family properties, the income approach to valuation is widely used by real estate agents, appraisers and lenders. This approach requires determining an annual market capitalization rate (based on the income of comparable sales) and a property-specific cap rate, based on projected annual income of the subject property (a pro forma statement of rents), using a gross rent multiplier, divided by the current value of the property.

Example: If a 1 unit condo costs $120,000 to purchase and the expected rental income is $1,200 per month, then the expected annual income is: $14,400 divided by $120,000 (cost to purchase), equals a cap rate of 12%.

The cap rate Is helpful for comparison purposes, but for a closer look at your potential investment, you’ll need to consider inflation and deduct for it using a discounted cash flow model. You’ll also need to factor in the costs of a mortgage, known as annual debt service, property taxes, property insurance, and other miscellaneous expenses such as water, electricity, landscaping, security, reserves for replacement, preventative maintenance, etc.

Q2. How Do You Calculate ROI?

When comparing investment options, properties with a higher ROI will help you make the best choice with regard to the greatest return on investment. To calculate your ROI, divide your profits by your investment cost. For ROI to be meaningful, you must input the most realistic expenses that can be expected for the subject property. Otherwise, any costs that are manipulated or omitted, which would reduce the ROI, will paint a picture that is unrealistic, increasing your opportunity cost (that is, The cost of not investing in other investment options), and may burden you with additional operating costs every month during the holding period.

You should also consider the option of using a mortgage to acquire the property, versus paying cash, and consider the annual debt service, which are the mortgage payments, and how they impact your monthly and annual cash flows. Additionally, the upside of leverage (buying an asset using other peoples money, or OPM), may significantly increase your ROI.

Note: Don’t forget to factor in your closing costs, real estate commissions, etc. into your purchase price and sale price of the subject property; these are acquisition and disposition costs.

Before we examine ROI on a financed property let’s look at the ROI for a subject property purchased as a cash transaction.

As you can see in the case study the overall rate and a five year period for rental ROI is 8.8%. The overall rate (OAR) on value appreciation is 29.6% for the five-year period or 5.92% per year. Added with the rental income the total annual ROI per year is 14.72%!

Now, let’s take a look at the same investment property but, in this case, let’s use a mortgage to purchase a property.

As you can see in the second example the ROI on rental income is an overall rate of 16.9%! Wow! the ROI on the appreciation is 134%! Combined together, this property produces an annual ROI of 43.7% per year!

Q3. How Much Equity Will I Earn Through Appreciation?

It depends. The market dictates the sales price, and, as we all know, that fluctuates based on a variety of variables, such as political, social, cultural, “acts of God,” (such as hurricanes and tornadoes), and economical and business changes in the immediate environment (such as the installation of an Amazon distribution center or an Apple research park coming to Your Town, USA. That said, on average, real estate doubles in value every 10 years. Put another way, a property owner can estimate a 10% per year appreciation in a healthy market in the growth stage of its economic life.

The Four Stages of the Economic Life of a New Home Development: Growth, Stability, Decline, and Revitalization.

Given the science behind the economic life of a property and its community, the best time to purchase a home is when it is first built. Thus, the best time to sell would be at the end of the first 15 years of its growth or shortly into the stability phase. As a rule of thumb, a rental investment is less risky when the property was built within the last 10 years and the holding period should be no more than 10 years. Buying an investment property within these parameters will give you the best opportunity, external factors aside, to realize a 10% per year gain of appreciation in value.

Q4. What Are My Tax Burdens Going To Be?

That’s a tough question to answer because no two investors are examining their tax situation from the same position. If you lived in the home to out of the past five years prior to the sale, then you could be exempt from capital gains tax on the sale of the property buy up to $250,000 for a single person or up to $500,000 for a married couple. However, assuming the property was rented for all five years of the holding period, then you would report your profit as capital gains, which that amount would depend on adjustments such as depreciation and other taxable income which would shift your tax bracket up or down.

Note, however, that a 1031 exchange Allows the seller to roll over the profit into another investment property of equal or higher value without incurring any capital gains taxes. Another note worth mentioning is that if the owner sells the property due to divorce or death and unmarried widow or divorce may count any time that their former spouse lived in the subject property under the exceptions to the “time and use” test. If that sounds like your situation, you should consult a real estate attorney in your market with expertise in real estate law.

Disclaimer: The author of this article is a non-licensed attorney. The information provided herein is for educational purposes only and is not intended to be used as legal advice.

Key Takeaways:

  • Return on investment (ROI) Can be used to calculate the value of an investment based on its monthly cash flow’s, as well as during the entire holding period.
  • To see the true ROI, consider the return with appreciation over an extended holding period, such as five years.
  • ROI tends to be much higher when buying an investment using other peoples money, or OPM, with a five year holding.

Are You Ready to Take the Next Step to Invest?

Posted in Real Estate Investing

June – a slow month for Home Sales

 (increasing mortgage rates) “…may have taken some of the steam out of the market.”

ScreenHunter_114 Jul. 23 07.07

After hitting a 3.5 year record high, home sales took a dip of 1.2% in sales to an annual rate of 5.08 million home sales in June.  According to Lawrence Yun, Chief Economist for the National Association of Realtors, increasing mortgage rates “may have taken some of the steam out of the market.”

Nonetheless, there is still a lot of demand in most US cities. The problem lies in the most expensive regions: Hawaii, California, and the New York City metro area:

“We’re still dealing with a large pent-up demand,” he said. “However, higher mortgage interest rates will bite into high-cost regions of California, Hawaii and the New York City metro area market,” says Yun.

Foreclosures and short sales have taken a back seat in the market, accounting for 15% of existing home sales. With these distressed sales clearing the market, home sellers can expect a greater return on their properties as the median home price has increased 13.5% since June, 2012 – a consecutive gain in median home prices for 16 months!

If you are thinking of selling, there is a lot of demand for what buyers consider “good” homes and the conditions (demand) is continually improving, aside from the interest rate increase. But seriously, were we thinking that they’d actually stay that insanely low forever? Seriously? 

Source: Money.CNN.com

http://money.cnn.com/2013/07/22/real_estate/home-sales/index.html?section=money_realestate&